People Are More Likely to LIKE You If…

People Are More Likely to LIKE You If…

Have you ever wondered how to get someone to like you? They may think you’re pretty alright – whether this is a crush, friend, or acquaintance – but you want them to jump for joy at the mere sight of you! Well, that may not so easily happen… the literal jumping. But, there are a few things that people find likable. Do you do these things? Possess these traits? People are more likely to like you if… you do these five things.

These subtle behaviors would make others like you instantly: https://youtu.be/FJJWllfyTQo

Writer: Michal Mitchell
Script Manager: Kelly Soong
Voice: Amanda Silvera (www.youtube.com/amandasilvera)
Animator: Ira Alifia
YouTube Manager: Cindy Cheong

References:
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